survival

Things Look Bad Out There? Here’s Where to Start!

There comes a time when people look around and start to see through the complacency that most of the population is guilty of.  With that first realization that things might not always go as planned comes a little bit of panic.  All of a sudden you feel inadequately equipped to take care of yourself and your family.  If you let the unease or panic influence your decisions, you’ll start spinning your wheels or even worse, you’ll spend a bunch of time and money in ways that don’t offer much benefit.  I’m sure there are a lot of people out there with a case of MREs in a closet somewhere that don’t feel any better about their situation.  Then there are folks that do what modern people do when they don’t know something, hit Google and start reading.  The are tons of great resources on being prepared, but there is a lot of chaff to sort through.  I visited hundreds of website, blogs, and online stores before I started getting relevant information.  I haven’t found many sources for a new “prepper” to get information on where to start, so that prompted me to put one together.  I’m sure there are things I’ll miss, and some folks will think my priorities might be a little off.  I’ll take that risk to do my best to help someone new get started without feeling overwhelmed.  We’d all like to have a zombie proof compound in the Rockies and provide for all of our own needs, but that’s not a realistic short term goal for most of us.  Starting small and working up is the only way to approach being prepared.  If you start big and plan for massive global disaster, you’ll always feel inadequate and burnout will set in pretty quickly.  Starting small in your own home will give you a feeling of security and give you a base to build on. By starting small, you won’t prepare for any one specific disaster.  There are a lot of ways that things can go wrong in life.  It’s best to have basic levels of preparedness that will cover a lot of bases.  I’ll approach this as a step-by-step plan.  This might evolve into an easy to follow checklist with some input from others in the survival community.

Now let’s get to the nitty-gritty of gaining that warm and fuzzy feeling of knowing you are better prepared than most to weather the storms life might throw at us.  We all have basic needs to meet to maintain our basic survival like air, water, food, and shelter from the elements.  Air is pretty easy; if we don’t have it we are toast within a couple of minutes.  For simplicity, we’ll assume air will be available.  Water is the next important need to meet.  We can only go a couple of days without water before we expire so it needs to be taken seriously.  Food rates really high on the list as well.  We can go a few weeks without it, but those will be a few miserable weeks.  Hunger leading into starvation is probably one of the worst ways to die.  We’ll address these needs in our first step.

Step 1. Getting Our Homes in Order.

Being ready at home is as easy as having the things we need available to us every day.  Water and food storage is the best place to start.  Having a year of food and water put away is nice, but a giant step for any household.  Start smaller and look at having a week or two of reserves.  We live in a society that allows easy access to grocery stores and a seemingly endless supply of clean water from the tap.  Everyone takes this for granted.  If we need something, it’s a short trip to the store.  Maybe we do this several times a week.  At some point, there might be a situation where we can’t get to the store or delivery trucks can’t get to the store to restock.  It doesn’t take a massive disaster to cause this.  Maybe it’s something as common as a winter storm that makes driving unsafe for a few days.  A lot of times, most people never have food to go more than a couple of days.  If you have 2 weeks of reserves, you won’t even notice in your daily life.  The easiest way to approach building this reserves to look in your pantry and determine what foods that you eat have a long shelf life.  Once you have an idea, start buying one or two extra items when you grocery shop.  It starts to add up quickly.  It is easy to start looking at all sorts of stuff at the store to find the longest shelf life, but limit it to foods you like to eat. A case of SPAM doesn’t matter much if you hate the stuff.  “Store what you eat and eat what you store” is a common saying in the survival community.  If you like beans, then that makes a great item to have extra on hand.  Pasta is another favorite that store well and a lot of people eat regularly.  Keep in mind that you aren’t looking for large amounts that will last for years.  This is stuff you like to eat, so you’ll be using it and replacing it when you go to the store.  This way you have food reserves, but they are constantly being rotated as you prepare meals. Use the oldest first and put the new to the back of the pantry. Now you are not only storing a little extra food, you also have a rotation system in place to make sure you always have fresh food if you need to rely on your storage for any reason.
Storing water often gets overlooked because we have complete faith in our water supply systems.  Every time we turn on the faucet, clean water comes out.  Water is bulky and heavy, so why would we want to store it?  Simply put, our water system can and has failed in the past.  It might be a major catastrophe or something as simple as a water main break that interrupts service to a part of your town.  If you’ve ever had this happen, you know how quickly grocery stores run out of bottled water.  You can store bottled water in individual bottles or in larger containers if you would like. I do this myself, but I also have some regular tap water stored.  Water from the tap is usually clean and very cheap.  It can be stored in 2 liter soda bottles or in specific water storage containers.  I use 7 gallon water containers with a spigot on the lid so it is easy to pour.  I got mine in the camping section of a big box store for less than $10 a piece.  How much you store is up to you and how much room you can spare, but a good rule of thumb is a gallon per person per day.  It never hurts to have more stored for washing dishes and ourselves and flushing toilets.  Now for a word of advice I learned the hard way… Don’t store water in milk jugs.  The plastic they are made from is designed to be biodegradable and they will start to break down after a short period of time.  Also, protect your water containers from freezing.  Some are not durable enough to handle the expansion of freezing water and they can crack or rupture.

Step 2. Prepared on the Go.

There might be a time where we have to leave our home to escape a disaster.  I’ve seen personally the effects of someone having to leave their house in a rush.  In a panic mode, most people will not be thinking clearly and will forget crucial items or they will try to get too much and won’t end up getting much at all in the rush.  This is where the often mentioned Bug Out Bag (BOB) comes into play.  If you have to “bug out” in a hurry, you need a bag that is already put together that you can grab on the way out the door. like to keep mine in my vehicle, but it’s up to you so long as you can get to it quickly.
The basic concept of a BOB is a bag that can sustain you for 3 days.  The contents should be able to meet your basic survival needs. Food and water is a must.  Enough water for three days is heavy and hard to carry, so I have some water and a few means to source water wherever I might end up.  Water filtration and purification means are important.  Hiking water filters and purification tabs serve well.  I also keep a 1oz bottle of bleach with me.  One ounce of bleach will purify more what than you can imagine, like hundreds of gallons.  I also have a means to prepare and eat the food I have in my bag.  You will probably want a way to start a fire and shelter yourself  case you have to spend the night outside. Having a change of clothes and extra socks and underwear will go a long way toward making a survival situation easier to bear.  It would be easy for me to go into great detail on what the perfect BOB should contain, but a lot is personal choice and there are so many resources on the web that cover it better than I can.  I’ll post links at the end of the article to help you get started.  I’ve also covered overlooked items in a different article, which you can read about here.

 

Step 3.  Your Vehicle.

I’ve already written an article covering vehicle preparedness that you can read here.  A lot of people feel better about having their house and BOB ready, but overlook the vehicle.  Most of us will take our vehicle if we need to get out quickly, so having what we need there is important.  During the widespread evacuations of the Houston area preceding Hurricane Rita, countless motorists got stranded in the gridlock that resulted on every major road out.  Most people weren’t prepared to evacuate, so they were at the mercy of others for help to get out of harm’s way and off the road.  If you’ve read this far into the article, I’m assuming you don’t want to be one of these people any more.

 

Step 4. Defense.

In a perfect world, defense would just be limited to keeping the snakes and bears when away in the woods, but we don’t live in a perfect world.  In fact, we live in a world where people will literally try to kill others over a sale item at a store the day after Thanksgiving.  I’m a firm believer that in most cases the majority of people are good. They will help others and work together to make the world a better place. There are those that are out to hurt, kill, and steal, but I think they are the smallest percent of our population.  BUT, when there is a disaster, people panic.  When people panic, they do things they would normally never do.  The mild mannered accountant might just shoot you in the face to take food if his children are starving.  I’m not saying this to scare anyone, and I don’t believe it is the norm, but the threats are there.  There are those that would do you harm, either out of malice or out of fear.  All of your best preparations are useless if you cannot defend yourself when a wolf is at the door.  I know some of my readers live in areas where gun ownership might be difficult or impossible.   For most of us it is a right, and one that should be exercised. However, ownership is not enough.  Training on the safe and proper use is a mandatory responsibility of all gun owners.  Additional training on defensive uses are highly recommended.  Most of us might never have to defend ourselves, but it is our responsibility to do so if the time comes.  It is also our duty to do so in a means that is appropriate to the level of threat we are faced with.  There are personal, societal, and legal ramifications with this subject that I am not qualified to comment on, so I’ll leave it up to each individual.

 

Step 5.  Feel Better and Start Learning.

Once you have the basics of being prepared underway, you should start to feel a little better about where you are.  Knowing that you are better prepared to face what life might throw at you is a liberating feeling.  I know how I felt when I knew that something as simple as an ice storm wouldn’t make my life miserable.  I’m not saying that having to face a disaster would be fun, but it’s a little less scary when you can rely on the steps you’ve taken so far.  Most of us at this point begin to feel empowered.  We know we can’t control the world around us, but we know we can take steps to handle a lot more than we could before.  For me this was the catalyst to start exploring other ways to take back control.  This was my first step in self reliance.  Now I focus on learning skill and gaining knowledge that will help me as I strive for more freedom from dependency.  Which steps you take next are up to you.  For me it was learning ways to remove dependency.  Growing a garden to provide my family with real, healthy food was a great step in that direction.  I was lucky to grow up in a family that placed a lot of emphasis on providing for ourselves.  We always had a garden.  Now I’m looking at ways to do it better.  Every skill you learn should have a benefit.  In my life, learning simple things like how to preserve food or fix a vehicle has not only saved me a ton of money, it gives me a feeling that I am in better control of my life.  It’s these little skills that tell me I can handle problems as they arise.  There is a feeling of freedom there that I hope each and every reader at Surviving Modern Life will grab and make their own.

 

Links for the Bug Out Bag

Here is a good list, but leans toward being prepared for all out collapse.

This is a very thorough list.

One of the better articles I’ve seen on BOBs

FEMA has some thoughts on how to prepare.

Another great article on getting started can be found here.

 

Greetings From The Remote Bug Out Location

It finally happened.  I’ve been telling everyone for years that they should be preparing for the zombie apocalypse, but they wouldn’t listen.  Now who’s laughing at who.  Most of them have had their brains pulled out and eaten, or they’ve become part of the undead hoards themselves.  Sarah, the girls and I are safe and sound in an undisclosed location away from major population centers.  We are 12 days into the zombie occupation. We’ve been without power for 7 days.  The laptop has a pretty low power draw, so I’m able to use my meager solar capabilities to run it.  Somehow, the internet connection is still working.  I guess they build in a lot of automation and redundancy into the telecommunication systems.  Luckily the weather has been nice.  I wanted to share with the readers on how the preps have worked out and what we’ve learned since this ordeal started.

 

Wise brand long term food storage is good stuff.  The cheesy lasagna tastes pretty good and even the kids like it. Bacon SPAM is amazing, even under high stress situations.  It’s a little taste of home in a world of chaos.

My .270 Winchester is a superb long range zombie gun.  If I crank the scope up to 9 power, I can pick them off at 300 yards or a little more.  There haven’t been many zombies out here, but we see a few.  Being able to take them out long before they know where we are seems to keep more from showing up.  We did have one get up close, but the HiPoint carbine worked as advertised.

Getting information has been difficult to say the least.  We saw zombies conducting the national news, but we don’t know whether they were infected or not.  It’s hard to tell with the hosts of the major news networks.  Local radio stations have started going off air, but they didn’t know any more than we did.  We think it all started in New York with the Occupy Wall Street movement and spread quickly.  Apparently dirty hippies were more dangerous than we thought.  I always thought the self proclaimed “99%” were out to destroy our world, but I didn’t think they would do it in such a literal way.

I’ve never been an avid football fan,but I realize how much I miss college football.  Since the Texas A&M Aggies literally devoured the boys from the University of Texas, all football games seem to have been canceled.  I would imagine a virus that causes zombie-ism would transmit pretty quickly through a locker room.

The bug out location has a shallow well that we can dip with a bucket, so we don’t have to worry about getting water without power.  This has been a lifesaver.  We are also surrounded by a lot of ranch land.  Cows are unaffected by the virus, and are pretty much going about their daily lives.  Zombies seem to have no interest in the cows, so I think we have a sustainable, long term food source in case things don’t get back to normal soon.

I’m very glad to say we haven’t had to resort to my article about treatment for zombie bites.  Everyone is in good health and good spirits.

 

It looks like a cold front is moving in, so I’m hoping for freezing temperatures.  The zombies can’t move if they are frozen and it would give us a good chance to get out and see what’s going on with the world outside of the bug out location.
I’ll update further if anything new develops and the internet connection holds out.

Happy Halloween from Surviving Modern Life!!

 

 

You’re ready for a disaster! Even in your car??

We put a lot of thought in our preparations for emergency and disaster.  A lot of us keep food on hand, have a flashlight handy, and know where our first aid kit is.  Hopefully we feel ready to tackle any problems that life throws at us. Do we have that same feeling in our vehicle when we’re driving around or commuting to work?  A basic car kit can go a long way toward gaining that same feeling of security.

I find myself in a position that’s different from what I’m used to.  For years I’ve driven a big diesel pickup everywhere I go.  If you know anything about diesel pickups, you know they can carry a lot of stuff.  When I’m in my truck I feel comfortable to face situations ranging from having to overnight on the side of the road to heading into the woods and starting society over from scratch.  You might think I’m joking, but I really do carry a LOT of stuff in my truck.  I literally have the equipment and tools to do major motor work, hunt large game, build a log cabin, and communicate with the outside world by a host of different means.  I even have solar battery charging capabilities.  My truck truly is a rolling bugout location.  The only downside…  it’s not my daily driver any more.  When I took a job 45 miles away, the price of fuel was draining my budget.  I opted to buy a little used car that gets excellent mileage.  I now spend 10 times less on fuel, but at the cost of that peace of mind I have in my truck.  I’ve really started to put a lot of thought into what the perfect car kit for emergencies would be and I’m starting to put this kit together.

 

One of the most important aspects to consider is what you might need this kit to do and what situations you might face.  Some of these will be unique to your circumstances, but some items will be universal to all vehicles.  The first, and most likely scenario I prepare for is being stranded.  There can be a few reasons why I might get stranded, but the result is the same.  I might be there for a while, and want to make the best of the situation.

We know that we have basic needs in any survival situation.  I could go as basic as possible and say that the most important is air, but unless you drive your car into a lake, that shouldn’t be a problem.  Water, as basic as it sounds, is very important.  The old standby advice is one gallon per person per day.  Generally, we won’t need to store a lot of water since we aren’t planning on multiple days in the car.  One gallon per person should be more than enough.  I personally keep a few 20 ounce bottles of water in my little car.  Having water in the car saved me from a major inconvenience just recently.  I didn’t need the water to survive, but when my car decided to spring a leak in a hose I was able to repair the leak on the side of the road and top the radiator off with some of my storage water.

Another consideration is protection from the elements.  It rarely gets really cold here in Texas, but we do see some cold winter weather.  Cold isn’t really an issue when we can keep the car running and the heater on full blast, but if we can’t for some reason, that cold can become a serious problem.  Every year when we get ice on the roads, there are people that skid off in the ditch and can’t get back on the road. And it seems to happen at night more often that not.  Some will probably be waiting hours for help to come get them.  In a situation like this, running out of gas can make for a very uncomfortable night.  It might even be fatal.  A simple solution would be a blanket of some sort.  Wool blankets are pretty inexpensive and will help you stay warm in some pretty low temperatures.  Emergency blankets work too, but they aren’t very comfortable and you have to cocoon into them for them to work well.  If this breakdown is in the Summer here in Texas, there’s not much that can be done.  It’s going to be hot.  Be glad for that water!

After the initial stress of ending up in this predicament fades, you might start to get a little hungry.  Some snack foods might come in handy to make the time go by a little easier.  I know I certainly function better when I’m not focusing on an empty stomach.  Any non perishable food will work for the vehicle, but you have to apply common sense.  What works in the house for food storage might not work well in the vehicle.  Temperature is one of the biggest concerns.  Where I live and drive the most, temperatures can range from 5 degrees in my vehicle all the way up to close to 200 degrees in the truck or passenger cabin.  Freezing or extreme heat can break glass containers, and the heat can certainly turn an aluminum or tin can into a food grenade (ask me how I know!)  Plenty of options are available that will handle these temperatures.  Cookies and crackers come to mind first.  Beef jerky is another.  I know these aren’t the healthiest choices, but we’re in a survival situation that hopefully won’t be lasting too long.  Besides, you can go weeks without food before you die.  These are here as a comfort item more than anything.

Now that we can make sure we aren’t going to be miserable or die from lacking basic needs, we can look at other items.  Sanitation needs might want to be covered.  If you are stranded on the side of the road away from everything when nature calls, a roll of toilet paper in a ziplock bag is about to become your best friend.  Keeping it in a ziplock bag will keep it clean and dry while it rides shotgun with you waiting for that moment of need.  Some basic hygiene items tossed in might round out the package and come in handy even if you aren’t forced to stay in your car.  There has been more than one occasion where I’ve stayed the night somewhere unexpectedly and having a few items in my car saved a trip to the store so I could brush my teeth and apply deodorant.

Once these needs are all met, lets figure out how to get ourselves out of the situation.  Communication is key.  Most all of us have cell phones these days, and they make life more convenient than ever when they work.  Its a good idea to make sure you have a way to keep it charged in the car.  A dead battery makes the smartest of phone as useful as a rock in no time.  For most situations, a working phone will get word out and get help on the way.  But in true prepper fashion, I like to have redundancy.  CB radios and other two way radios can get word out in emergencies, and they don’t rely on the wireless network that cell phones depend on.  Handheld CB radios can be had for almost nothing and make an excellent source for secondary communication.  Remember, channel 9 on the CB band is for emergency use only.  Channel 19 is known as the “trucker channel” and generally has a lot of traffic, especially near major highways.  I go a step further and add HAM radio to my arsenal, but this isn’t practical for everyone.  For one, its a licensed band, meaning you have to take a test and get your license to transmit.  This rule doesn’t apply in an emergency.  In a true emergency, you can use any band or frequency available to call for help.  Make sure it is a real emergency (defined as threat to life or property).

Now on to the stuff every car should have before it ever gets on the road.  A lot of these will seem obvious, but I’m shocked at the people that don’t have any of them.  Make sure your vehicle has a spare tire.  Make sure it’s aired up!  Even if you aren’t much of a mechanic, you should keep a basic tool kit in your car.  It will come in handy for minor repairs. If you can’t perform the repairs, that good Samaritan that stops to help might be able to if only he hadn’t forgotten his toolbox.  You can fix that at least!  We all forget to turn off the lights or we leave something plugged into the cigarette lighter.  Then we have a dead battery.  Its much easier to get someone to give you a jump start if you have your own jumper cables.  Most people are willing to help their fellow man, but no one seems prepared to these days.  If you want to go all out in being prepared, there are power packs available that allow you to jump start your own vehicle.  Here are some examples. 12 volt air compressors can be had on the cheap and will save your bacon in case of a flat.  I bought one in new condition at a flea market for $7 and its paid for itself a dozen times over.   All of us understand the need for a good first aid kit.  Have a better one in your car at all times.  You never know when you might be the first to respond to an accident or need to use it for yourself.  Having a good flashlight really comes into play if you are stranded after dark.  Not being able to see might have you believe you are stuck when you really aren’t.  It will also help with those minor repairs and avoiding that rattlesnake if you need to use that toilet paper.

I could continue this article for pages about other survival items you might need; like matches and lighters, signal mirrors, emergency whistles, etc.  Those are items you will have to decide if they are worth keeping in you car.  Look at your bug out bag and see if there are items that would serve you well if duplicated in your vehicle.  I didn’t really cover much about vehicle safety in this article because I’m planning in covering that in a separate article in the near future.  In the meantime, use your head and practice common sense around traffic and vehicles.  Also, stay tuned for articles about vehicle self defense, and bugging out in your vehicle.

 

 

You’ve been bitten by a zombie??? I can help with that!!

Since the article about tactical medical treatment was well received, I thought I should continue in that same area. Penetrating wounds can be very ugly, but one of the ugliest wounds a person can receive is a bite from a zombie.  Zombie mouths are very unclean, and these bites almost always result in secondary infection.  Treating the initial wound is pretty straightforward.  This type of first aid is covered in the most basic kits, even the ten dollar “Band-Aid and Aspirin” kits available at the big box stores.  We’ll cover primary and secondary treatments in this article.

Primary Treatment:

Bite wounds can be pretty minor all the way to serious injuries.  Luckily, humans don’t have really sharp teeth or long canines.  It takes a lot of force to break the skin.  Typically the result is bruising more than cutting or tearing.  For bruising, simply wash the affected area with soap and water and administer a pain reliever for pain.  You can also apply ice to reduce pain and swelling.  Remember, you never want to apply ice directly to the skin.  If there is some bleeding or torn skin, the area will still need to be washed well with a good anti-bacterial soap and water.  Once the area is cleaned thoroughly and dried, you can proceed with basic first aid.  A simple bandage should do nicely to keep the wound covered.

 

Secondary Treatment:

The good news about these types of injuries is that they most often occur on hands and/or limbs.  The likelihood of the actual bite being fatal is pretty slim.  The bad news is the potential for infection.  Bites from humans or animals are nasty enough, but if that bite is from a zombie, the resulting infection is bad news.  If you are treating a victim for a zombie bite and the skin has been broken, your victim is almost certainly infected.  The incubation period is 12 to 24 hours.  After this time, your victim is technically deceased, but is probably still moving, moaning, and trying to violently bite you.  At this point, treatment involves destroying the victim’s brain.  Firearms work best, and I prefer .40 caliber handguns and .30 caliber rifles.  Use what works best for you.

 

 

*Disclaimer: While the section on primary treatment of bite wound is sound advice, the secondary treatment is written for comic purposes.  I do not condone shooting anyone in the head.  However, if the person really has become the walking dead, please handle the situation as you deem necessary. And please let me know as soon as possible so I can bug out to an undisclosed location away from population centers.

I suck at the Internet.

I’ll start out by apologizing for not getting a post up on the site sooner.  Apparently, I’m not nearly as internet savvy as I originally thought.  I managed to lock myself out of my own website and had a little trouble setting up the email account through my hosting company.  That’s the trouble with the DIY mindset.  Sometimes, you don’t actually know enough to do it yourself, but that won’t stop someone as stubborn as me from pushing on!  I could have resolved the issues a lot sooner if I had called tech support, but I knew I would figure it out on my own (by the way, I didn’t figure it out and had to call tech support).  I’m still winging it for the most part, but the important pieces are coming together.  I haven’t deleted any files that make my webpage work since the second day.  I’m pretty sure I’ve learned enough about WordPress to make this post available.  I might even be able to get pictures uploaded and in posts soon.  If you check back and get some awful error, rest assured I will be working to get it fixed, even if I have to make a dreaded call to tech support!

 

I’d like to point out that there is a “blogroll” to the right of where you are reading right now.  Blogroll is just a cuter, bloggier way of saying “Links”.  If I knew more about code language, I would change it to “Links”, but that might result in a very poor looking webpage.  We’ll leave it alone for the time being.

On that blogroll, I’ve added a few links that I visit often.  These websites have been a great source of information for me.  Of particular note are the Backwoods Home link, and the Ask Jackie Clay that is a part of BWH.  Backwoods home is a print and online publication that specializes in homesteading and self reliance.  They have some of the most knowledgeable writers out there on anything related to homesteading.  Jackie Clay is one of their more popular bloggers.  To say that she is an expert on food storage would be the understatement of the year.  I’ve learned more from reading her blog and reader questions than I’ve found in a dozen books.

Two more of the links are for the Survival Podcast and AgriTrue.  The Survival Podcast is by far the most popular podcast relating to survivalism and self reliance.  It is done by Jack Spirko, and he is one of the sharpest guys out there.  He’s been podcasting for over three years, and has built an awesome community.  AgriTrue is a new concept of his that is just getting off the ground.  I could go into detail about it, but that would take up a lot of space, and it would rehash what is waiting for you if you click that link.

Zombie Squad is a group based in St. Louis, with chapters all over the world.  At their core, they are an emergency preparedness and survival group that focuses on education.  It draws a younger crowd than normally found with groups of that type.  I’ve met a lot of great people through Zombie Squad and I’ve learned a LOT.

Last but not least, there is a link for the Freedom Feens podcast.  It is hosted by Michael W. Dean and Neema Vedadi.  I met Michael a few years ago through a message board and have been keeping up with his many projects since then.  The Freedom Feens are libertarian while still being fun to listen to.  Its not a lot of the same monotonous drivel that seems to permeate the liberty movement.

Please take some time to visit these sites.  I’ve learned a lot of great information, and hope that everyone else can too.  I’ll be adding more links as time goes on, but these folks are near and dear to my heart so I wanted to give them special attention.

Now that I’ve got the basics figured out on this new world of websites, I’ll be getting stuff posted more frequently.  I’m going to start with some gear reviews, then venture into subject that interest me.  A little gardening, some food storage, energy, the potential for flesh eating hoards to come shambling down my road.

-Justin

Introduction

A little while back I realized that I spend too much time thinking about a few specific subjects.  I’m constantly pondering emergency preparedness, self reliance, homesteading, and self defense.  I also spend way too much time considering the outcome of a full out zombie uprising.  While it would be nice to have a large homestead that is fully self sufficient and fortified against the hordes of the undead… time, finances, and normal life seem to be in the way.   This website is a public outlet of working toward these goals, however lengthy the journey may be.  I believe that the mind is the most powerful tool in any survival situation, so I focus on learning as many skills as possible.  I still have a lot to learn.  I also believe knowledge is best shared, so I’ve created this website to share what I’m learning with anyone interested.  I’m by no means an expert on survival or homesteading, so take this as a disclaimer.  There are many out there with a lot more knowledge and expertise on these subjects.  I’m not trying to become the next Bear Grylls or Dave Canterbury.  I also won’t focus on one specific area, like wilderness survival or homesteading.  I like the “Jack of all trades, and master of none” approach.

Another subject dear to my heart is liberty.  We have become a society that is more than willing to trade freedom for security.  So long as our routines are not upset, we will submit to just about anything that encroaches on our individual rights.  We will go where we are told, eat what we are told, and live the way we are told.  We are told who to vote for.  Sure, we are given two choices, but those choices are for essentially the same thing.  We have become completely dependent on these systems that take our freedoms and offer us comfort and entertainment in return.  I’ve been unplugging myself from as many of these systems as possible, and being self reliant is a natural step in that direction.  I’ll try not to turn this site into a political rant, but some of the content will be political in nature.

Thanks for taking time to read this and I hope to have you back soon! Please feel free to jump in and comment on any content, or offer suggestions for content or improvement.

Thanks,

Justin